IPIS ASM CAR

Mapping artisanal mining sites in the Western Central African Republic (2019)

This report presents an analysis of the artisanal mining sector in western Central African Republic (CAR) and outlines some of the challenges surrounding gold and diamond mining, trade and export. From April to July 2019, the International Peace Information Service (IPIS), in partnership with national authorities, carried out a mapping of artisanal mining sites in

Central African Republic – Ouham-Pende Basemap (2019)

Each year the annual migration of transnational transhumance through the prefecture of Ouham-Pende, in northwestern Central African Republic (CAR), uproots a deep-seated mistrust between nomadic and sedentary communities. Escalating militancy and environmental pressures in the region has only amplified these issues in recent years. These maps, created by IPIS, detail the towns, villages, roads, IDP

Maps of CAR

Central African Republic: A Conflict Mapping (2018)

In a new report and webmap on the longstanding crisis in the Central African Republic (CAR), IPIS points out that access to resources remains the predominant driver of both armament and conflict in CAR. All armed groups operating in CAR  are engaged in predation on one or more economic sectors. Such predation is not only

Pastoralism corridors in Central African Republic (2017)

While pastoralism can generates wealth and economic interdependence between farmers and cattle herders, it can also causes tension and conflicts. In the current Central African Republic crisis context, transnational livestock migrations, particularly by Chadian and Sudanese herdsmen to CAR, have led to clashes between pastoralists and the local population. IPIS has developed a map showing

République Centrafricaine: Portait d’un territoire riche en crises (2012 – 2017)

This poster is a compilation of maps and graphics related to the situation in the Central African Republic. A map of natural resources and poaching corridors presents the known wealth of this country, often considered as conflict drivers in the absence of well functioning state authorities. A small map presents the current armed groups area

Natural Resources in Central African Republic (2017)

With an area of 622 984km2, the Central African Republic is the 20th largest country in Africa and one of the poorest in the world.  Its economy is highly dependent of the primary sector. Whereas distribution of income is deeply unequal, the unstable political situation and the violent confrontations between different armed groups all around

Central African Republic – Road Map (2017)

In 2013 the Central African Republic entered a period of great instability. The predominantly Muslim rebel coalition, Seleka, seized power. A group of mostly Christian militias, the Anti-balaka, rose up to counter the Seleka. Years of atrocities, horrors and fighting followed. In 2016 a democratic election was held, a sign of hope for the people

Mapping Conflict Motives: the Central African Republic (2012-2014)

In this study, IPIS analyses the conflict dynamics in the Central African Republic (CAR) since the outbreak of the latest crisis in September 2012 up to September 2014. The analysis specifically looks into the motivations and interests of the main conflict parties, Seleka and anti-balaka, and the influence and interests of neighbouring countries. The report

A Taxonomy of Non-State Armed Actors in the Central African Republic (2012)

This report hopes to provide an overview of how the Central African Republic got to where it is now, as well as to present the means to further our understanding of the current situation. First a genealogy of the current situation is provided, which is presented in the form of a narrative literature overview encompassing

Mapping Conflict Motives: Central African Republic (2009)

Not many areas in the Central African Republic are really secure. Although the country is scarcely populated, it is tormented by a multitude of armed actors. These belligerents use their weapons for a diversity of reasons but they have one thing in common: each of them would be a weak opponent for any well-organised state,

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