Author: Peer Schouten

Promoting peaceful and seasonal migration in Northern Central African Republic

February 9, 2021

“You can negotiate with an armed group, not with the drought” The borderlands of the Central African Republic (CAR) are home to one of the largest seasonal livestock migrations (transhumance) in the world. Decades of unrest and crisis, however, have brutally disrupted most aspects of herding—the routes taken, the people involved, governance mechanisms, as well as relations to local populations. To


Maps of DRC

Mapping artisanal mining areas and mineral supply chains in eastern DRC (2019)

April 9, 2019

In a new report and webmap, IPIS presents its updated data on armed conflict and armed interference in eastern DRC’s artisanal mining sector. Building on extensive data, gathered over the last ten years, IPIS assesses the impact of responsible sourcing initiatives in DRC, designed to address armed interference in mineral supply chains. The report illustrates that responsible sourcing efforts have


CAR Roadblock economy

Article – The Political Economy of Roadblocks in the Central African Republic

October 2, 2018

From September 2016 to September 2017, the International Peace Information Service (IPIS) and the Danish Institute for International Studies (DIIS) conducted a mapping of roadblocks in the Central African Republic. This data collection campaign also features more than 200 interviews with various actors and was combined with data from other reports on roadblocks to form a comprehensive study on the


Roadblocks CAR

The Politics of Pillage: the political economy of roadblocks in the Central African Republic (2017)

December 7, 2017

IPIS puts roadblocks on the map as key mechanism of conflict funding besides natural resources, revealing its devastating scope in funding armed actors in Democratic Republic of Congo and Central African Republic Mapping over a thousand roadblocks, IPIS uncovers the shocking extent of armed predation on trade routes in conflict-ridden Central Africa. Roadblocks, IPIS claims, have netted armed grou


IPIS Briefing March 2020

“Everything that moves will be taxed”: the political economy of roadblocks in North and South Kivu (2017)

December 6, 2017

IPIS puts roadblocks on the map as key mechanism of conflict funding besides natural resources, revealing its devastating scope in funding armed actors in Democratic Republic of Congo and Central African Republic Mapping over a thousand roadblocks,  IPIS shows the shocking extent of armed predation on trade routes in conflict-ridden Central Africa. Roadblocks, IPIS claims, have netted armed groups


Pillage route: l’économie politique des barrages routiers à Walikale et Masisi (2017)

March 31, 2017

  French version below – version française ci-dessous Roadblocks are a ubiquitous phenomenon in Eastern Congo. In an effort to map the scope of this phenomenon as well as its significance in the political economy of conflict, IPIS has embarked on a collaboration with the Danish Institute for International Studies. The point of departure is that control over the circulation of people and valua


Het conflict in de Centraal-Afrikaanse Republiek

January 27, 2017

In 2014 deed IPIS een uitgebreid ‘conflict mapping’ onderzoek om inzicht te krijgen in de veiligheidssituatie in de Centraal-Afrikaanse Republiek (CAR). Dit leidde tot de publicatie van een publiek toegankelijke webkaart over belangrijke conflictdynamieken. IPIS bracht de gewapende groepen, mensenrechtenschendingen, natuurlijke rijkdommen, vluchtelingenstromen en migratieroutes van veehouders in k


Extractive Orders: a political geography of public authority in Ituri, DR Congo

April 19, 2016

Public authority is an essentially contested concept in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Not only is the ‘state of the state’ subject to profound disagreement in academic debates, but public authority on the ground is also the focal point of heated contestation. While some argue that the DRC does not exist as a state from the perspective of normative understandings of statehood, others argu


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